Research at Mosaic Life Care

At Mosaic Life Care, we’re always working to make health care better through finding new treatments, techniques and technology. It’s what drives our care for you. By supporting and conducting extensive research and clinical studies, we work to make medical treatments more effective for our patients today, and through their help, much more effective for future generations.

Clinical Research and Clinical Trials

Clinical research seeks to investigate, analyze and pursue the development of new medicines and treatments through volunteers who work with doctors and researchers to make medicine better.

Clinical trials are part of the research process and play a key role in discovering new solutions for detecting, treating and preventing illnesses like cancer and heart disease. It is important to note that clinical trials may take place together with a patient’s standard treatment. There are several types of clinical trials. Some examples are: prevention trials, observational trials, and treatment trials

Prevention trials try to find better ways to prevent people from getting cancer or lower the chances that people will get it.

Observational trials do not involve investigational drugs or treatments. Researchers typically observe participants to measure and record their health outcomes.

Treatment trials test how well a drug, therapy or procedure works and then evaluates the health outcomes of the patients.

Finally, all research and clinical trials follow ethical guidelines and federal regulations to ensure the utmost safety of all participants.

Why Should I Participate?

Research is an important part of learning more about and improving cancer care. Patients who volunteer to participate expand their treatment options and help advance medical knowledge that may improve health care for future cancer patients. The truth is, without clinical research, modern medicine would not be where it is today.

Current Areas of Research

Mosaic Life Care participates in several areas of research that can include:

  • Clinical drug trials
  • Clinical device trials
  • Treatment protocols
  • Disease registries
  • Historical/retrospective analysis
  • Investigator initiated projects
  • Pharmacy resident research

A majority of our medical research is focused on cancer (oncology/hematology) and cardiology.

 

Cancer Research

Research is an important part of cancer care because it drives the scientific discoveries that result in new, more effective treatments. Mosaic Life Care participates in several types of cancer research:

  • Clinical drug trials – research involving investigational drugs or new uses for existing drugs.
  • Clinical device trials – research involving new devices that only patients with the condition the device is designed for can participate.
  • Disease registry – a data collection of persons with cancer.
  • Historical/retrospective analysis – a study of suspected risk factors and facts that occurred or could have influenced a current situation.
  • Investigator initiated projects – research that is conceived, designed and conducted by Mosaic Life Care researchers.
  • Pharmacy resident research – postgraduate pharmaceutical research conducted by pharmacy residents.

Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are studies that take place along with a patient’s cancer treatment plan. Clinical trials are the safest and fastest way to determine how well a new treatment or medical procedure works in humans.

Clinical trials are also useful in comparing existing treatments and discovering new ways to deliver approved treatments to maximize results and minimize side effects.

Learn more about the benefits of joining a cancer clinical trial and some of the myths and facts involved in participating in a trial.

Case Studies

A case study is research that provides in-depth analysis through observation of an individual, group or situation in order to prove a theory. By collecting, evaluating and analyzing data, researchers at Mosaic Life Care create case studies that help identify and understand situations that impact or influence cancer treatment and care. Some of our recent case studies include:

Patient Stories

Through the most advanced cancer treatments available, Mosaic Life Care Cancer Care works to turn patients into survivors. Meet our cancer survivors, watch their stories and hear firsthand how they beat cancer.

Why Participate?

Participating in clinical research is the key to advancing cancer treatment and care. Your participation may include extra tests, lab work, questionnaires, or conversations with the research team. You will receive additional monitoring of your ongoing health status by our research nurses which may improve your overall outcomes. You may also have the opportunity to receive medications or treatments that wouldn’t otherwise be available to you.

Most importantly, your participation could ultimately contribute to discoveries that will help others in the future. Additionally, your participation can, depending on your case, match an existing treatment or explore new treatments. Either way, it’s always your choice to participate or end participation at any time.

If you’re interested in current Mosaic Life Care research, speak with your doctor. He or she can explain what treatment options exist and what patient benefits could result from participating in research trials.

Learn more about Mosaic Life Care clinical trials or visit the Center for Information and Study on Clinical Research Participation for more information on how you can participate in a clinical study.

 

Cardiology Research

Cardiology research is essential to enhancing the prevention, detection and treatment of heart and vascular disease and other heart-related issues. Mosaic Life Care participates in a variety of cardiology research:

  • Clinical drug trials – research involving new drugs or new applications of existing drugs.
  • Clinical device trials – research involving new devices available only to patients with the condition for which the device was designed.
  • Disease registry – a data collection of persons with cardiovascular issues.
  • Historical/retrospective analysis – a study of suspected risk factors and facts that occurred or could have influenced a current situation.
  • Investigator initiated projects – research that is conceived, designed and conducted by Mosaic Life Care researchers.
  • Pharmacy resident research – postgraduate pharmaceutical research conducted by pharmacy residents.

Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are the safest and fastest way to determine how well a treatment or medical procedure works in humans. They are often used to help answer specific health questions and see if a medication, treatment, or procedure can help advance cardiology care. Clinical trials are also useful in comparing existing treatments and discovering new ways to deliver approved treatments to maximize results and minimize side effects.

Learn more about the benefits of joining a cardiology trial and some of the frequently asked questions involved in trial participation.

Why Participate?

Participating in clinical research is the key to advancing cardiology treatment and care. Participants may also be able to access new treatments and ultimately contribute to research that will help others. It’s important to point out that a patient’s participation can, depending on their case, match an existing treatment or explore new treatments. Either way, it’s always the patient’s choice to participate or end participation.

If you are interested in current Mosaic Life Care trials, talk with your doctor. He or she can explain what treatment options exist and what patient benefits could result from participating in research trials.

Learn more about Mosaic Life Care clinical trials or visit the Center for Information and Study on Clinical Research Participation for more information on how you can participate in a clinical study.

 

Clinical Research Trials

Clinical research is the key to understanding how to prevent, diagnose and treat illness. It relies on patient volunteers and researchers working together to investigate new treatments, therapies, techniques and approaches in order to benefit future patients.

A clinical trial is one form of a clinical research study focused on investigating new treatments or new uses for existing treatments. Trials typically involve testing the safety and effectiveness of new drugs in humans.

The clinical trial categories at Mosaic Life Care include:

  • Data Registry – monitors the health status of an identified group of patients and the treatment or care they receive. Data registries allow doctors and researchers to see how patients react to treatments and measure effectiveness of the treatment or drug.
  • Pharmaceutical Trial – tests a new drug or an existing FDA-approved drug that’s being used for a different type of illness or disease other than what it was originally designed to treat.
  • Comparison of Standard of Care Trial – a long-term study of the typical procedures or care given to a patient for a given situation. The comparison looks at which treatment was more effective.

The Four Phases of Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are conducted in a series of four steps or phases.

Phase I – Usually tests a drug or treatment on a small volunteer group to determine safety, dosing, efficacy and tolerance.

Phase II – Tests a new drug or treatment on a larger group of volunteers to confirm effectiveness and further verify safety.

Phase III – Tests a new drug or treatment on another large group of volunteers and monitors side effects and compares results with a standard or existing drug or treatment.

Phase IV – Further tests a drug or treatment after it has been approved by the FDA in order to track safety and performance in the general population.

How to Participate

If you are interested in participating in the medical research currently being conducted at Mosaic Life Care, the first step is to speak with your doctor. He or she can explain what treatment options exist and what benefits could result from participating in research trials.

You can also visit the Center for Information and Study on Clinical Research Participation for more information on how you can participate in a clinical study.

 

Clinical Trials FAQ

Mosaic Life Care offers our patients a unique chance to help doctors improve health care and treatment by participating in clinical trials.

The benefits of participating in a clinical trial at Mosaic Life Care include access to new treatments, additional expert medical care and the opportunity to help others by contributing to medical research and treatment advancements.

Common Questions About Clinical Trials

Q: Are clinical trials dangerous?

A: The safety of clinical trial volunteers is our top priority. Before they start, all trials are reviewed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and an Institutional Review Board (IRB) —made up of doctors, scientists and community members — whose primary responsibility is to ensure any trial we open at our institution is conducted in a safe and ethical manner. Clinical trial volunteers are closely monitored by their medical team and our expert research staff. All treatments have gone through a rigorous testing process and undergo ongoing monitoring for quality assurance.

Q: Aren’t clinical trial volunteers just like guinea pigs?

A: Every clinical trial provides the volunteer with detailed information that will help him or her decide on whether or not to participate. Informed consent means we explain the purpose of the trial, what visits and treatments are required, what kind of activities or procedures will take place, and any potential risks and benefits.

Q: If I participate in a clinical trial, could I get a placebo or “sugar pill” instead of a real drug?

A: You will still receive approved cancer-care treatments throughout a clinical trial. Most cancer-related clinical trials do not use a placebo, though some do because it is the only way to tell if a new treatment works. If there is any chance that a clinical trial involves a placebo, you will be told during the informed consent process before you decide to participate.

Q: If I participate in a clinical trial, will I get the same level of care that I receive with my doctor?

A: Patients receive excellent care in clinical trials. Trials involve very detailed procedures and often include additional tests and visits to monitor a patient’s progress.

Q: The process for selecting volunteers seems unfair. Aren’t some people who try to participate told that they can’t?

A: Every clinical trial has a list of qualifications (such as age, sex and restricted health conditions) that must be followed to participate. Each trial is different and has its own set of rules which are ultimately designed to protect volunteers.

Q: Do trials include painful or unpleasant aspects?

A: Each clinical trial involves different activities which the doctor(s) will discuss with each participant in detail. The institutional review board ensures that the benefits and risks are weighed and that the trial is reviewed for unnecessary harm or discomfort.

Q: If there is a clinical trial that could help me, will my doctor tell me about it?

A: New trials become available all the time, and you may have an opportunity to research these options before seeing your physician. We encourage you to check the most current listing of clinical trials being offered at Mosaic Life Care by searching for “Heartland Regional Medical Center, St. Joseph” on the National Institute of Health’s website.

Q: Does being in a clinical trial help the volunteer?

A: Participating in a clinical trial may improve your medical condition. You may receive extra tests, lab work and monitoring that you might not otherwise have access to. You also may have the opportunity to receive a drug or treatment that would not typically be available to you. Volunteers play a key role in helping scientists find new treatments that will allow people to live longer and have healthier lives.

Q: Isn’t it true that clinical trials cost a lot of money and aren’t covered by insurance?

A: Many insurance companies pay for costs that are not covered by the research sponsors. Trial subjects rarely have to pay any trial costs. Sometimes volunteers are even reimbursed for expenses they might incur, such as transportation.

Q: If I sign up for a clinical trial, do I have to commit to finishing the trial, even if I don’t want to?

A: You can stop being part of the trial at any time, but should always let the trial team know first, because some medications should not be stopped without a doctor’s supervision.