About Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

At Mosaic Life Care Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, board-certified physiatrists (doctors who specialize in physical medicine and rehabilitation) provide diagnostic and restorative care for patients experiencing a variety of disabilities, functional deficits or deterioration. Our work includes joint replacements, as well as a wide range of non-surgical options to help with joint pain. Working with patients ages 10 and older, we develop individualized and customized treatment programs for each person. This is done in both inpatient and outpatient settings.

 

Conditions We Treat and Procedures Performed

There are many reasons patients need to see a physiatrist. Often, patients experience pain or dysfunction as a result of:

  • Polytrauma/accidents (i.e. amputations)
  • Neurological (i.e. strokes, Multiple Sclerosis or neuropathy)
  • Rheumatological (i.e. arthritis)
  • Normal aging (i.e. back or neck pain)
  • Pulmonary/cardiac (i.e. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Congestive Heart Failure)
  • Obesity
  • Endocrine (i.e. Diabetes Mellitus)
  • Cancer
  • Sports injuries
  • Work injuries

Physiatrists at Mosaic Life Care perform the following special procedures:

  • EMG/NCS (electromyography and nerve conduction studies)
  • Joint injections
  • Trigger point injections
  • Botox injections for spasticity (i.e. late effects of cerebrovascular accident, closed head injury and spinal cord injury), hyperhidrosis and dystonia
  • Platelet rich plasma injections
  • Regenerative injection procedures for tendon or ligament pain
  • Ultrasound guidance for injections
 

Related Programs and Services

Joint Replacement

Get back to the life you want.

Our Total Joint Replacement Program was established in 2008 with the philosophy most total joint patients are generally healthy people, who pursue surgical replacement to restore mobility and increase function, so they can regain their lives. With that foundation, we have developed a program that is designed to get you up and moving, back home and doing the activities that you enjoy as quickly and safely as possible.

Treatments and Procedures

To achieve the best results, pre-surgery and post-surgery must be followed as closely as possible. Our program is designed to prepare you for surgery, educate you about your surgical options, offer the safest, most effective operations and provide all the tools you’ll need after surgery to get the best results possible.

Total Joint Replacement (Knee or Hip)

If your knee, hip or shoulder is severely damaged by disease or injury, it may be hard for you to perform simple activities such as walking or climbing stairs. You may even begin to feel pain while you are sitting or lying down. It may be that medications, change in your activity level, or using walking supports are no longer helpful. If other treatments have not been effective in relieving your pain or improving your mobility, your orthopedic surgeon may recommend a total joint replacement.

Total Knee Replacement

The knee is a hinge joint and is one of the most complicated joints in the body. The knee is comprised of three bones: the femur (thighbone), the tibia (the big bone of the lower leg) and the patella (kneecap). Your femur and tibia meet at the knee joint. The rounded ends of the femur and tibia are protected with articular cartilage that cushions the joint during movement. The sides of the knee are referred to as the lateral (outer) side and the medial (inner) side.

Total knee replacement is a surgery to replace the surface of an injured or worn knee joint with a man-made joint, called an implant or prosthesis. The prosthesis is made of metal, ceramic, plastic or a combination of these materials. Your surgeon will select the best model for your individual needs.

A “total knee” consists of three components. The femoral component (top portion) wraps around the bottom surface of the femur. The tibia component (bottom portion) replaces the top surface of tibia. The patella component (kneecap portion) replaces the back surface of the patella where it glides in the groove of the femur.

Your orthopedic surgeon will make an incision over your knee to expose the joint. The damaged cartilage and a very small amount of bone will be removed with precision guides and instrumentation. The prosthesis will then be implanted over your bone to improve joint motion, correct alignment and decrease pain.

The surgery should take about one to one and a half hours for a single knee replacement and about two to two and a half hours for bilateral (both) knees. Most total knee replacements will last 25 years or longer. After this time, if needed, your surgeon may suggest a revision to replace one or more of the worn components.

Uni-Compartmental (Partial) Knee Replacement

A partial or uni-compartmental knee replacement may be indicated if the osteoarthritis or degenerative joint disease only affects one side (medial or lateral) or one compartment of the knee joint while the other surfaces of the joint are healthy. The partial knee replacement entails a smaller incision to allow the surgeon to remove only the diseased or damaged portion before placing the implant on one side of the knee.

Many patients are able to be discharged from the hospital on the same day or the morning following surgery. Rehabilitation time is shortened, and patients may return to normal lifestyle and activities in less time.

Total Hip Replacement

The hip is one of the largest weight-bearing joints in the body. The hip is a very stable ball-and-socket joint. The femoral head (ball) at the top of the femur (thigh bone) fits into the acetabulum (a rounded socket or cup-like cavity) in your pelvis. A layer of smooth tissue called articular cartilage cushions the surface of the bones, helping the ball to rotate easily in the socket. Bands of tissues called ligaments form a capsule connecting the ball to the socket and holding the bones in place.

Total hip replacement is a surgery to replace an injured or worn hip joint with a manmade joint, called an implant or prosthesis. The prosthesis is made of metal, ceramic, plastic or a combination of these materials. The implants may be held in place by special bone cement or by your own bone as it grows into the implant. Your surgeon will decide the type of prosthesis that is right for you based on your bone structure, joint, age, weight and activity. There are two different approaches to a hip replacement: One, with an incision on the back side of your hip, or another, with an incision on the front side of your hip. The surgeon will make the incision then, he will then dislocate the hip and use special instrumentation to remove the femoral head (ball) and replace the hip joint that has been damaged with implants.

A total hip implant usually consists of a femoral component (bottom portion or stem), a femoral head (ball) and an acetabular shell and liner (socket portion). Once all of the components are in place, the surgeon will manipulate your leg to confirm the proper fit and placement prior to closing the incision.

Total Shoulder Replacement (Arthroplasty)

Your orthopedic surgeon will make an incision along the front of your shoulder to expose the joint. The damaged cartilage and bone will be removed using special instrumentation. The bone is replaced with implants made from metal alloy and durable plastic.

A total shoulder usually consists of a humeral component (bottom portion or stem), a humeral head (ball) and a glenoid (socket). Once all of the components are in place, the surgeon will manipulate your arm to confirm the proper fit and placement prior to closing the incision.

Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement Surgery

A reverse total shoulder may work better for individuals who have completely torn the rotator cuff with severe arm weakness, have the effects of severe arthritis and rotator cuff tearing (cuff tear arthropathy) or have had failure with a previous shoulder replacement. In a reverse total shoulder replacement, the anatomy of the shoulder is reversed; the socket and head are switched. The glenosphere (metal ball) is attached to the scapula (shoulder bone) and the humeral cup (socket) is attached to the upper end of the humeral stem. The reverse total shoulder uses the deltoid muscle rather than the torn rotator cuff to power and position the arm.

The surgery for total shoulder and reverse total shoulder usually takes about one and a half hours for your surgeon to complete. You will remain in the hospital for a couple of days, depending on your progress. Most shoulder replacements will last 15-20 years with normal use. If the implant needs to be replaced after time, a revision of one or more of the components may be discussed by your surgeon.

What To Expect

To achieve the best results, pre-surgery and post-surgery must be followed as closely as possible. Our program is designed to prepare you for surgery, educate you about your surgical options, offer the safest, most effective operations and provide all the tools you’ll need after surgery to get the best results possible.

Preparing for Your Visit

Please call (816) 271-7673 to set up an appointment. Then keep the following things in mind as you prepare for your visit:

  • When you schedule your appointment, confirm the location and where to park.
  • Be sure to ask what information you need to bring with you (insurance card, medical records, list of current medications, etc.).
  • Make note of your symptoms, concerns and questions and be prepared to speak with your doctor about these issues.
  • If you need assistance, consider bringing a friend or family member with you.
  • Be prepared to take notes during your appointment so you fully understand your doctor’s instructions and suggested next steps.

Patient Guide Book

Once you are approved for surgery, you will be given a Patient Guide Book to help you prepare for your surgery, know what to expect during your hospital stay and guide you as your recover and rehabilitate to normal activities. This guide book will cover things like:

  • Choosing a coach (family member or friend) to help you reach your goals
  • Pre-admission testing and education
  • Preparing your home
  • Controlling risk factors
  • Medications
  • Exercises
  • Night before surgery
  • Day of surgery
  • Admission
  • Surgery
  • Anesthesia
  • Pain management
  • Preventing complications
  • Rehabilitation
  • Recovery at home
  • Daily activities

Education and Resources

Mosaic Life Care Orthopedic and Sports Medicine offers procedures to help you achieve and maintain a healthier life.

Are You a Candidate for Total Joint Replacement for Your Hip, Knee or Shoulder?

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis, or degenerative joint disease, affects the cartilage lining the ends of bones. The cartilage becomes worn, no longer allowing smooth movement of the bones inside the joint. With osteoarthritis, you may experience a painful, grinding sensation at the joint, indicating that the bone surfaces are rubbing against each other. Pain, stiffness, swelling and loss of function are common as the cartilage continues to wear away.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease that causes chronic inflammation of the joints. The joint inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis causes swelling, pain, stiffness and redness in the joints and other tissues around the joints. In some patients, the chronic inflammation leads to destruction of the cartilage, bone and ligaments, causing deformity of the joints.

Avascular Necrosis

Avascular necrosis is the lack of or interruption of blood supply to the bone causing the bone to die and the bone to collapse. Loss of blood supply can be caused by injury, long term systemic steroid use, radiation, excessive alcohol use or secondary from treatment of a fracture. Joint pain increases as bone and joint collapses and range of motion is limited due to the pain.

Fracture

A fracture of the humerus (bone in your upper arm) or femur (bone in your upper leg) can occur from a fall or other injury. The humeral head (ball) or femoral head may break, leaving the bones in pieces requiring a total hip or shoulder replacement surgery.

Rotator Cuff Tear (Shoulder)

The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and connecting tendons in the shoulder. It attaches your humerus (upper arm) to your scapula (shoulder blade) and holds your arm in the glenoid (shoulder socket). A healthy rotator cuff gives your shoulder flexibility and control. It helps you to move the shoulder.

A patient with a large, long standing rotator cuff tear may develop cuff tear arthropathy which may lead to arthritis, as the ball of the humerus rides up against the bones of your shoulder. The joint then becomes painful, stiff and weak. This pain may routinely wake you up at night.

Total Joint Replacement (Knee or Hip)

If your knee, hip or shoulder is severely damaged by disease or injury, it may be hard for you to perform simple activities such as walking or climbing stairs. You may even begin to feel pain while you are sitting or lying down. It may be that medications, change in your activity level, or using walking supports are no longer helpful. If other treatments have not been effective in relieving your pain or improving your mobility, your orthopedic surgeon may recommend a total joint replacement.

Total Knee Replacement

The knee is a hinge joint and is one of the most complicated joints in the body. The knee is comprised of three bones: the femur (thighbone), the tibia (the big bone of the lower leg) and the patella (kneecap). Your femur and tibia meet at the knee joint. The rounded ends of the femur and tibia are protected with articular cartilage that cushions the joint during movement. The sides of the knee are referred to as the lateral (outer) side and the medial (inner) side.

Total knee replacement is a surgery to replace the surface of an injured or worn knee joint with a man-made joint, called an implant or prosthesis. The prosthesis is made of metal, ceramic, plastic or a combination of these materials. Your surgeon will select the best model for your individual needs.

A “total knee” consists of three components. The femoral component (top portion) wraps around the bottom surface of the femur. The tibia component (bottom portion) replaces the top surface of tibia. The patella component (kneecap portion) replaces the back surface of the patella where it glides in the groove of the femur.

Your orthopedic surgeon will make an incision over your knee to expose the joint. The damaged cartilage and a very small amount of bone will be removed with precision guides and instrumentation. The prosthesis will then be implanted over your bone to improve joint motion, correct alignment and decrease pain.

The surgery should take about one to one and a half hours for a single knee replacement and about two to two and a half hours for bilateral (both) knees. Most total knee replacements will last 25 years or longer. After this time, if needed, your surgeon may suggest a revision to replace one or more of the worn components.

Uni-Compartmental (Partial) Knee Replacement

A partial or uni-compartmental knee replacement may be indicated if the osteoarthritis or degenerative joint disease only affects one side (medial or lateral) or one compartment of the knee joint while the other surfaces of the joint are healthy. The partial knee replacement entails a smaller incision to allow the surgeon to remove only the diseased or damaged portion before placing the implant on one side of the knee.

Many patients are able to be discharged from the hospital on the same day or the morning following surgery. Rehabilitation time is shortened, and patients may return to normal lifestyle and activities in less time.

Total Hip Replacement

The hip is one of the largest weight-bearing joints in the body. The hip is a very stable ball-and-socket joint. The femoral head (ball) at the top of the femur (thigh bone) fits into the acetabulum (a rounded socket or cup-like cavity) in your pelvis. A layer of smooth tissue called articular cartilage cushions the surface of the bones, helping the ball to rotate easily in the socket. Bands of tissues called ligaments form a capsule connecting the ball to the socket and holding the bones in place.

Total hip replacement is a surgery to replace an injured or worn hip joint with a manmade joint, called an implant or prosthesis. The prosthesis is made of metal, ceramic, plastic or a combination of these materials. The implants may be held in place by special bone cement or by your own bone as it grows into the implant. Your surgeon will decide the type of prosthesis that is right for you based on your bone structure, joint, age, weight and activity. There are two different approaches to a hip replacement: One, with an incision on the back side of your hip, or another, with an incision on the front side of your hip. The surgeon will make the incision then, he will then dislocate the hip and use special instrumentation to remove the femoral head (ball) and replace the hip joint that has been damaged with implants.

A total hip implant usually consists of a femoral component (bottom portion or stem), a femoral head (ball) and an acetabular shell and liner (socket portion). Once all of the components are in place, the surgeon will manipulate your leg to confirm the proper fit and placement prior to closing the incision.

Total Shoulder Replacement (Arthroplasty)

Your orthopedic surgeon will make an incision along the front of your shoulder to expose the joint. The damaged cartilage and bone will be removed using special instrumentation. The bone is replaced with implants made from metal alloy and durable plastic.

A total shoulder usually consists of a humeral component (bottom portion or stem), a humeral head (ball) and a glenoid (socket). Once all of the components are in place, the surgeon will manipulate your arm to confirm the proper fit and placement prior to closing the incision.

Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement Surgery

A reverse total shoulder may work better for individuals who have completely torn the rotator cuff with severe arm weakness, have the effects of severe arthritis and rotator cuff tearing (cuff tear arthropathy) or have had failure with a previous shoulder replacement. In a reverse total shoulder replacement, the anatomy of the shoulder is reversed; the socket and head are switched. The glenosphere (metal ball) is attached to the scapula (shoulder bone) and the humeral cup (socket) is attached to the upper end of the humeral stem. The reverse total shoulder uses the deltoid muscle rather than the torn rotator cuff to power and position the arm.

The surgery for total shoulder and reverse total shoulder usually takes about one and a half hours for your surgeon to complete. You will remain in the hospital for a couple of days, depending on your progress. Most shoulder replacements will last 15-20 years with normal use. If the implant needs to be replaced after time, a revision of one or more of the components may be discussed by your surgeon.

Sports Medicine

Mosaic Life Care Sports Medicine encompasses a full spectrum of injury treatment and prevention for athletes of all ages. The program includes care from family care doctors and physical therapists. We offer same-day appointments and same-day imaging services, as well as priority-care scheduling for doctor, imaging and therapy visits.

Mosaic Life Care doctors also work in conjunction with our certified athletic trainers to provide on-site coverage to local high school and college athletic teams. We’re dedicated to working with youth sports programs in the community to provide convenient access to the same level of care that professional sports teams receive.

Learn More

Physical Therapy

A rehabilitation program is specifically designed for each individual depending on the injury, disorder or illness. A multidisciplinary team approach for care and service is the basis of rehabilitation treatment. Multidisciplinary refers to the fact that many different disciplines work together toward a common goal.

Learn More

 

Our Team

The Mosaic Life Care Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation team includes:

  • Board Certified Physiatrists
  • Advanced Practice Nurse
  • Licensed Practical Nurses
  • Certified Medical Assistant
  • Certified Athletic Trainer
  • Patient Care Representatives
  • Patient Access Representatives, HeartSaver certified
  • Clinic Manager, HeartSaver certified
 

Providers

Specialties: Sports Medicine, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

(816) 271-7673
Accepting New Patients
 
Specialties: Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

(816) 271-7673
Accepting New Patients
 
Specialties: Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

(816) 271-7673
Accepting New Patients
 
Specialties: Nurse Practitioner

(816) 271-7673
Accepting New Patients